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Biodiesel produciton from camelina

This page lists all articles published worldwide in journal, book, magazine or otherwise about biodiesel produciton from camelina oil. Please provide us a feedback feedback if you see any error in this listing or you would like to report and articles that should have been in this section. Your help will make this a great place to find articles about biodiesel feedstock.

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  1. An evaluation of biodiesel production from Camelina sativa grown in Nova Scotia
    Abstract

    Yang, J.; Caldwell, C.; Corscadden, K.; He, Q. S.; Li, J. L. 2016. An evaluation of biodiesel production from Camelina sativa grown in Nova Scotia. Industrial Crops and Products. 81162-168

    Camelina sativa has recently attracted great interest as an energy crop for biodiesel production in North America. To assess the feasibility of biodiesel production from camelina, the cultivation conditions, camelina oil fatty acid profile, alkali-catalyzed transesterificaiton process and fuel properties of camelina biodiesel were investigated. Unrefined camelina oil, containing 10%, 33.2% and 56.8% saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids respectively, was used to synthesize biodiesel. The conversion rate of C. sativa oil to its methyl esters was 96% under optimal reaction conditions. Most fuel properties of the resulting camelina biodiesel were in good agreement with specifications of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM D6751) and European standard (EN 14214), such as kinematic viscosity, acid number, flash point, sulfur content, total glycerol content. Its cetane number (49.7) was satisfactory according to ASTM D6751, but not for EN 14214. Camelina biodiesel exhibited poor oxidative stability (1,9 h) resulting from the high percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acid methyl esters. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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  2. Technoeconomic analysis of small-scale farmer-owned Camelina oil extraction as feedstock for biodiesel production: A case study in the Canadian prairies
    Abstract

    Mupondwa, E.; Li, X.; Falk, K.; Gugel, R.; Tabil, L. 2016. Technoeconomic analysis of small-scale farmer-owned Camelina oil extraction as feedstock for biodiesel production: A case study in the Canadian prairies. Industrial Crops and Products. 9076-86

    This study evaluated costs and profitability associated with small scale camelina oil extraction plant in the Canadian Prairies for the purpose of selling camelina oil for further biodiesel production. In this case, Camelina sativa is targeted for production on underutilized summerfallow land to avoid displacement of crop lands. Saskatchewan soil zone 7A has the capacity to provide camelina for oil extraction based on small scale capacities of 30,000-120,000 t annum(-1) and capital investment of $10-24 million. Oil production price is reduced with increased camelina oil content, field yield, plant scale, and camelina meal price. Oil production costs range from $0.39 to $1.88 L-1 when camelina meal has a market value of $0.30 kg(-1). These results provide an informative basis for investment decisions by farmers and investors vis-a-vis the advancement of farm-adoption of camelina as a dedicated industrial crop, as well as the development of an integrated camelina-to-processing oilseed value-chain. Crown Copyright (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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  3. Study on utilization of Camelina seed for production of biodiesel fuel
    Abstract

    Mosio-Mosiewski, J.; Luczkiewicz, T.; Warzala, M.; Nawracala, J.; Nosal, H.; Kurasiak-Popowska, D. 2015. Study on utilization of Camelina seed for production of biodiesel fuel. Przemysl Chemiczny. 94(3) 369-373

    Camelina oil from the seeds of winter camelina variety Luna was studied for acid, iodine and saponification nos., P content, d., kinematic and dynamic viscosities and chem. compn. and then used for prodn. of fatty acid Me esters by 2-step transesterification in presence of KOH at 50 degrees C for 1 h in a steel reactor (2 m(3)). The aq. glycerol-contg. phase was neutralized with H3PO4 and distd. to sep. glicerol and PK fertilizer. The product quality was good enough for usual applications.
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  4. Ultrasound-assisted biodiesel production from Camelina sativa oil
    Abstract

    Saez-Bastante, J.; Ortega-Roman, C.; Pinzi, S.; Lara-Raya, F. R.; Leiva-Candia, D. E.; Dorado, M. P. 2015. Ultrasound-assisted biodiesel production from Camelina sativa oil. Bioresource Technology. 185116-124

    The main drawbacks of biodiesel production are high reaction temperatures, stirring and time. These could be alleviated by aiding transesterification with alternative energy sources, i.e. ultrasound (US). In this study, biodiesel was obtained from Camelina sativa oil, aided with an ultrasonic probe (20 kHz, 70% duty cycle, 50% amplitude). Design of experiments included the combination of sonication and agitation cycles, w/wo heating (50 degrees C). To gain knowledge about the implications of the proposed methodology, conventional transesterification was optimized, resulting in higher needs on catalyst concentration and reaction time, compared to the proposed reaction. Although FAME content met EN 14103 standard, FAME yields were lower than those provided by US-assisted transesterification. Energy consumption measurements showed that ultrasound assisted transesterification required lower energy, temperature, catalyst and reaction time. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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  5. False flax (Camelina sativa L.) as an alternative source for biodiesel production
    Abstract

    Karcauskiene, D.; Sendzikiene, E.; Makareviciene, V.; Zaleckas, E.; Repsiene, R.; Ambrazaitiene, D. 2014. False flax (Camelina sativa L.) as an alternative source for biodiesel production. Zemdirbyste-Agriculture. 101(2) 161-168

    The current study hypothesizes that false flax (Camelina sativa L.), as a high-value biofuel feedstock, could be grown under humid conditions of western Lithuania and that nitrogen fertilisation could influence its seed yield and oil content. The following objectives were pursued: 1) to determine the optimum nitrogen fertiliser rate for winter (N-0, N-50, N-100, N-150) and summer (N-0, N-30, N-60, N-90, N-120) types of false flax, 2) to estimate false flax seed oil content, its composition and feasibility to use it for the production of biodiesel fuel. The experiments were conducted in 2008-2011 at the Vezaiciai Branch of the Lithuanian Research Centre for Agriculture and Forestry. It was revealed that the highest (1.28 t ha(-1), in 2010) and (1.29 t ha(-1), in 2011) as well as cost-efficient summer false flax seed yield was produced having fertilised with 90 kg ha(-1) of nitrogen. Significantly highest (1.2 t ha(-1), in 2011 and 1.6 t ha(-1), in 2010) winter false flax seed yield was obtained having fertilised with N-100. In our study, the seed oil content of summer false flax amounted to 40.3% and that of winter false flax was lower - 37.0%. Nitrogen fertilisation (N-150 and N-120) increased protein content in winter false flax seed from 22.98% to 26.97% and in summer false flax seed from 20.53% to 23.23% and did not reduce seed oil content. Methyl esters of false flax oil have a high iodine value and an especially high content of polyunsaturated linolenic acid: it reached 38.2% in winter false flax oil and 34.3% in summer false flax oil. Therefore false flax methyl esters can be used as fuel for diesel engines only in mixtures containing 40-50% of methyl esters of animal origin (used frying oil or pork lard). The most effective antioxidant Ionol BF200 (optimal dosage - 500 ppm) as well as the most effective depressants Wintron XC-30 (optimal dosage - 1500 ppm) and Infineum R-442 (optimal dosage - 1200 ppm) were selected for improvement of oxidation stability and cold flow properties of esters.
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  6. Optimization of high-energy density biodiesel production from camelina sativa oil under supercritical 1-butanol conditions
    Abstract

    Sun, Y. Q.; Ponnusamy, S.; Muppaneni, T.; Reddy, H. K.; Patil, P. D.; Li, C. Z.; Jiang, L. J.; Deng, S. G. 2014. Optimization of high-energy density biodiesel production from camelina sativa oil under supercritical 1-butanol conditions. Fuel. 135522-529

    Transesterification of camelina sativa oil to produce fatty acid butyl esters under supercritical 1-butanol conditions was systematically studied at alcohol to oil molar ratios of 20:1-60:1, reaction temperatures of 280-320 degrees C, and reaction times of 20-100 min. The response surface methodology was applied to evaluate the effects of process parameters on the transesterification yield and biodiesel quality. Two mathematic models for different time ranges of 20-60 min and 30-100 min were developed and combined to predict the response over a long reaction time range. The predicted responses agree well with the experimental yields. A maximum biodiesel yield of 87.6% was obtained at a reaction time of 305 degrees C, 1-butanol to camelina oil molar ratio of 40: 1, and reaction time of 80 min. The physical properties of butyl biodiesel were evaluated and compared with those of regular diesel. The good cold temperature property (pour point of -19 degrees C) and high calorific value (HHV of 39.97 MJ/kg) make the camelina oil butyl biodiesel an ideal liquid transportation fuel. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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