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Corn oil as biodiesel feedstock

This page lists articles published worldwide in journal, book, magazine or otherwise about corn oil as biodiesel feedstock. Please provide us a feedback feedback if you see any error in this listing or you would like to report and articles that should have been in this section. Your help will make this a great place to find articles about biodiesel feedstock.

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  1. Conversion of corn stover alkaline pre-treatment waste streams into biodiesel via Rhodococci
    Abstract

    Le, R. K.; Wells, T.; Das, P.; Meng, X. Z.; Stoklosa, R. J.; Bhalla, A.; Hodge, D. B.; Yuan, J. S.; Ragauskas, A. J. 2017. Conversion of corn stover alkaline pre-treatment waste streams into biodiesel via Rhodococci. Rsc Advances. 7(7) 4108-4115

    The bioconversion of second-generation cellulosic ethanol waste streams into biodiesel via oleaginous bacteria is a novel optimization strategy for biorefineries with substantial potential for rapid development. In this study, one-and two-stage alkali/alkali-peroxide pretreatment waste streams of corn stover were separately implemented as feedstocks in 96 h batch reactor fermentations with wild-type Rhodococcus opacus PD 630, R. opacus DSM 1069, and R. jostii DSM 44719T. Here we show using P-31-NMR, HPAEC-PAD, and SEC analyses, that the more rigorous and chemically-efficient two-stage chemical pretreatment effluent provided higher concentrations of solubilized glucose and lower molecular weight (similar to 70-300 g mol(-1)) lignin degradation products thereby enabling improved cellular density, viability, and oleaginicity in each respective strain. The most significant yields were by R. opacus PD 630, which converted 6.2% of organic content with a maximal total lipid production of 1.3 g L-1 and accumulated 42.1% in oils based on cell dry weight after 48 h.
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  2. Exploration of Carbon Based Solid Acid Catalyst Derived from Corn Starch for Conversion of Non-edible Oil into Biodiesel
    Abstract

    Witono, J. R. B.; Hashigata, K.; Santoso, H.; Noordergraaf, I. W. 2017. Exploration of Carbon Based Solid Acid Catalyst Derived from Corn Starch for Conversion of Non-edible Oil into Biodiesel. 3rd International Multidisciplinary Microscopy and Microanalysis Congress (Interm). 186157-164

    To avoid the problems caused by free fatty acids in the conversion of low cost vegetable oils to biodiesel, the use of solid acid catalyst for (trans-) esterification reaction is considered. Such a catalyst could be produced eco-friendly by using renewable raw materials such as biomass. The use of starch for this purpose it still very limited. In this paper, various methods were explored to produce a solid acid catalyst from corn starch. We investigated two different carbonization methods: complete pyrolysis in an oxygen-free environment and hydrothermal carbonization at milder conditions. Starch was used either in the native form or as pregelatinized starch. After the carbonization, acidic sites were introduced by sulfonating the materials. To characterize the catalysts, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was applied while the sulfonic content was determined by Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). To test the performance of the catalysts, the conversion of free fatty acids was determined using oleic acid as a representative component of biodiesel feedstock. By both of the carbonization methods, a catalyst can be obtained that shows up to 84 % conversion of oleic acid. The hydrothermal treatment may then be preferred since it can be done at milder conditions. Differences between the performances of the respective catalyst samples could be well explained by structural features seen in the SEM-pictures. These also have their effect on the amount of sulfonic groups that was found (from EDS). The general trend is logical: the catalysts with a higher sulfonic load give a higher conversion of oleic acid.
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  3. Influence of corn oil recovery on life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions of corn ethanol and corn oil biodiesel
    Abstract

    Wang, Z.; Dunn, J. B.; Han, J.; Wang, M. Q. 2015. Influence of corn oil recovery on life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions of corn ethanol and corn oil biodiesel. Biotechnol Biofuels. 8178

    BACKGROUND: Corn oil recovery and conversion to biodiesel has been widely adopted at corn ethanol plants recently. The US EPA has projected 2.6 billion liters of biodiesel will be produced from corn oil in 2022. Corn oil biodiesel may qualify for federal renewable identification number (RIN) credits under the Renewable Fuel Standard, as well as for low greenhouse gas (GHG) emission intensity credits under California's Low Carbon Fuel Standard. Because multiple products [ethanol, biodiesel, and distiller's grain with solubles (DGS)] are produced from one feedstock (corn), however, a careful co-product treatment approach is required to accurately estimate GHG intensities of both ethanol and corn oil biodiesel and to avoid double counting of benefits associated with corn oil biodiesel production. RESULTS: This study develops four co-product treatment methods: (1) displacement, (2) marginal, (3) hybrid allocation, and (4) process-level energy allocation. Life-cycle GHG emissions for corn oil biodiesel were more sensitive to the choice of co-product allocation method because significantly less corn oil biodiesel is produced than corn ethanol at a dry mill. Corn ethanol life-cycle GHG emissions with the displacement, marginal, and hybrid allocation approaches are similar (61, 62, and 59 g CO2e/MJ, respectively). Although corn ethanol and DGS share upstream farming and conversion burdens in both the hybrid and process-level energy allocation methods, DGS bears a higher burden in the latter because it has lower energy content per selling price as compared to corn ethanol. As a result, with the process-level allocation approach, ethanol's life-cycle GHG emissions are lower at 46 g CO2e/MJ. Corn oil biodiesel life-cycle GHG emissions from the marginal, hybrid allocation, and process-level energy allocation methods were 14, 59, and 45 g CO2e/MJ, respectively. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to investigate the influence corn oil yield, soy biodiesel, and defatted DGS displacement credits, and energy consumption for corn oil production and corn oil biodiesel production. CONCLUSIONS: This study's results demonstrate that co-product treatment methodology strongly influences corn oil biodiesel life-cycle GHG emissions and can affect how this fuel is treated under the Renewable Fuel and Low Carbon Fuel Standards.
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  4. Influence of corn oil recovery on life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions of corn ethanol and corn oil biodiesel
    Abstract

    Wang, Z. C.; Dunn, J. B.; Han, J. W.; Wang, M. Q. 2015. Influence of corn oil recovery on life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions of corn ethanol and corn oil biodiesel. Biotechnology for Biofuels. 8

    Background: Corn oil recovery and conversion to biodiesel has been widely adopted at corn ethanol plants recently. The US EPA has projected 2.6 billion liters of biodiesel will be produced from corn oil in 2022. Corn oil biodiesel may qualify for federal renewable identification number (RIN) credits under the Renewable Fuel Standard, as well as for low greenhouse gas (GHG) emission intensity credits under California's Low Carbon Fuel Standard. Because multiple products [ethanol, biodiesel, and distiller's grain with solubles (DGS)] are produced from one feedstock (corn), however, a careful co-product treatment approach is required to accurately estimate GHG intensities of both ethanol and corn oil biodiesel and to avoid double counting of benefits associated with corn oil biodiesel production.
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  5. Cold flow properties of biodiesel obtained from corn oil
    Abstract

    Rasimoglu, N.; Temur, H. 2014. Cold flow properties of biodiesel obtained from corn oil. Energy. 6857-60

    In this study, it is aimed to investigate the effects of parameters of transesterification on the cold flow properties of corn oil based biodiesel such as cloud point, pour point and cold filter plugging point. Reaction parameters examined were the transesterification temperature (in the range of 20-60 degrees C), reaction time (10-60 min), alcohol-to-oil ratio (3.15:1-12.85:1 in moles), amount of catalyst (0.25 2 g(catalyst)/100 mL corn oil) and stirring speed (300-800 rpm). As a result, it has been observed that when the transesterification reaction period is kept longer than 10 min, there were no changes in cold flow properties of the biodiesel obtained. In addition, better cold flow properties were monitored when alcohol-to-oil ratio was kept between 3.15:1 and 4.15:1. While no effect of reaction temperature on cold flow properties was observed above 20 degrees C, amount of basic catalyst used in the experiments gave the lowest cold flow properties at the percent of 0.75. Stirring speed has been ineffective in terms of cold flow properties in the transesterification process. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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  6. Biodiesel from Corn Distillers Dried Grains with Solubles: Preparation, Evaluation, and Properties
    Abstract

    Moser, B. R.; Vaughn, S. F. 2012. Biodiesel from Corn Distillers Dried Grains with Solubles: Preparation, Evaluation, and Properties. Bioenergy Research. 5(2) 439-449

    A coproduct of dry-grind ethanol fermentation, corn distillers' dried grains with solubles (DDGS) represents a low-cost feedstock with potential to integrate production of biodiesel and ethanol. Oil extracted from DDGS was converted into distillers' grains methyl (DGME) and ethyl (DGEE) esters. Pretreatment using sulfuric acid was effective at lowering the acid value of the crude oil from 27.15 to less than 0.30 mg KOH g(-1), thus rendering it amenable to homogenous, base-catalyzed transesterification. Measurement of fuel properties and comparison to refined corn oil methyl (RCME) and ethyl (RCEE) esters revealed that the cold flow properties and oxidative stability of DGME and DGEE were deficient relative to RCME and RCEE. In the absence of antioxidants, DGME and DGEE did not meet the oxidative stability specifications of ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. The cetane number of DGEE was below the minimum limit specified in EN 14214. DGEE exhibited more favorable cold flow properties, iodine value, and energy content than DGME. Evaluation of blends (B5 and B20) in petroleum diesel fuel revealed that antioxidants and cetane enhancers would be required to meet the specifications of the US and European diesel fuel standards. Other fuel properties of the petrodiesel blends were largely neutral with respect to alkyl ester type and conformed to the limits specified in the respective standards.
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